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The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has started to work in the European Union (EU) and also in other areas outside Europe. This means that websites and online businesses which do not comply with it face law suits and big fines. But the big question here on TechAppeala remains to be, does GDPR really apply in Kenya?

Does General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Apply in Kenya?
GDPR Illustr. | Source: Wikimedia Commons

First, What is GDPR?

Well, this is a law from the EU which strengthens and unifies data protection for people across the region. Some of the data include name, ID number, location and also online identifier. Other data include biometric, genetic, health, economic, cultural and also social info.

Law to Make EU Fit for Digital Age

The regulation strengthens people rights in the digital age. It also simplifies rules for firms, making businesses easier in the digital market. In addition, the law saves people from costly court suits and big fines.

Online Platforms to Edit Privacy Policy Pages

The law requires online admins to request consents from internet users to work with their data. The consent must be written in clear and plain language in the privacy policy page. This page must also be easy to find and the info easy to access.

So, Does GDPR Apply in Kenya?

Yes, it applies, but only to Kenyans who collect or process personal data of EU residents. It really matters to firms that monitor EU citizens using cookies or IP addresses. Some local firms that may need to comply with the law include internet and phone providers, media firms, airlines, banks and also insurance firms.

In conclusion, GDPR aims at protecting personal data of EU dwellers. It gives rights to internet users to ask websites to delete their data. As for Kenya and also other regions outside EU, the law affects them if they handle personal data of the EU residents.

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